Norfolk

Adventures in Jack's World

My dad is working and my mom is using that loud monster that sucks things off the floor (I HATE that thing) so I snuck in here to pen my thoughts to all of you. Its been some time and I need to make sure that they are telling the whole story for all of you. 

So, what's been going on?  Back in May, I got to go to Norfolk with the ship.  It wasn't too long of a trip...I'd say it took us about a year to get there, and we were there for like 6 hours (but I can't really tell time, so who knows).  This was a first for me, as it was the first cruise that I've worked, which was pretty cool.  There were a LOT of people on my ship, and that's the truth!  It was a pretty neat experience and people seemed surprised to see a dog on the ship.  Why is that?!?  Lots of people tried to get their picture taken with me, so I will admit, It made me feel like a celebrity dog, like maybe Lassie, or Beethoven or Tramp (in Lady and the Tramp).  

Then came the warm weather.  I was told that they were busy this summer, painting the ship and doing lots of work and that it was dangerous for me to be on board the ship, but then I find THESE pictures on my parents drive...  I'm not so sure what was going on, but some of it looks like monkey business was happening without me.  I tell you, do I have to DO everything around there and supervise everyone???  These people also apparently know how to make messes!

I had to do some dog-subliminal-messaging with the Captain, to let him know that things needed to change, and wouldn't you know it?  It worked... he told me that I could go to New York City on the ship.   This trip was a bit longer and it was pretty hot, too. I was the first one off the ship, and I had to leave my mark on the pier.  Let's say that my bladder must have been waiting for dry land, because people on the pier actually started clapping and cheering me as I was going to the bathroom.   Yep, I was blushing.  What? You don't think that dogs blush??? Well, I do!  

It was a neat trip and I got to hang out with lots of my favorite people.   The kids from New York's Harbor School were fun to hang out with too.   And then wouldn't you know it... I somehow hurt my paw.  They babied me each day but finally, midweek, my dad brought me to a nice vet clinic in Manhattan and they gave me medicine to kill the bad stuff that was making me sick, they wrapped my paw nicely and they gave me pain medicine and a very horrible cone of shame. That thing...   ugg {insert whole body shake and shiver},  THAT lasted all of one afternoon, until I convinced them that I was NO idiot and was not going to take off the bandage.  People!  Jeesh, its not like I'm dense...I get it!

But other than that, I got to hang out in New York City, and I saw the Statue of Liberty. I slept on the floor with the Captain half the time (not ALL my doing,  his wife asked me to keep him company since he would be missing her), and the other half with my dad. Sorry dad, but someone's got to hang out with the Captain and it's my job.  Here are some of the pictures I could find to show that I was there.  I'm just glad they didn't think to take a picture when they picked me up and put me on the surgery table to look at my foot, before deciding to take me to the vet. That was embarrassing, for pete's sake. 

Finally, this past weekend, we held our holiday party for crew members.  It's always good to hang out with all my peeps, especially when they're not covered in paint and smelly grease. Plus everyone dresses up nice and they smell good.  And don't tell my dad, but they also gave me food. AT THE TABLE, when my dad wasn't watching.   Hahaha...

These people writing the blog have been busy, so i'm sure they wont mind that I jumped in here to get the job done.  Hopefully I'll have more to tell you soon.  Until then, stay away from cats (they are mean and think they're better than everybody else!) and buy lots of treats for dogs (like me...hint, hint, hint...) 

~Jack (from the SS JOHN W BROWN)


Project Liberty Ship, Inc is a 501(c)3 non-profit, all volunteer organization engaged in the preservation and operation of the historic ship JOHN W. BROWN as a living memorial museum. Gifts to Project Liberty Ship are tax deductible.

Adopt A Rivet 2015 Own A Piece of History

Riveting began with the first iron hulled ships in the early 1800's and followed on the way blacksmiths joined two pieces of metal together.  As new technology was developed the process could be done by fewer men and more efficiently.

Liberty ships continued to be built with rivets after welding hulls had become more common.  Skilled rivet teams were plentiful and welders were still learning their trade.  Welding also came with problems of cracks and fractures.  The riveted hulls of the Liberty Ships produced at the Fairfield shipyard did not experience any failures.  The method used produced extremely strong hulls and the ships were in great demand even after the war for this reason.

The challenge to having rivet work done today is that there aren't many people who can do it.  Beyond skill it takes strength and endurance.  The rivet gun is heavy and most of the work is done facing upward on the bottom of the hull.  A visit to the shipyard takes a great deal of coordination, and money.  One way to raise funds for new rivets is to place old rivets in good homes.  For a tax deductible donation you can own your own piece of history.  Once you've read through the blog and watched the video you can CLICK HERE and send for your own rivet on a commemorative stand.

Our Rivets are available for a donation of $100.  We invite all donors to pick them up on the ship on April the 11th from 11am to 2pm. We will offer light fare, VIP access to the ship and the ability to have a preview of some of the new parts of our Living History Cruises.  If unable to attend April 11th, we will ship the rivets at that time to the remaining donors.

Here's a video showing the process of riveting the hull.  This is our own JOHN W BROWN at Colonna's Shipyard  this past fall.

Work begins in the plate shop. The steel plate has been cut to size and the holes are being drilled for the rivets.

Work begins in the plate shop. The steel plate has been cut to size and the holes are being drilled for the rivets.

The sized steel plate has been fitted into place on the ship’s hull. The butts of the plate are tack welded into place and the seams will be riveted.  This arrangement gives the hull more flexibility and strength than an all welded hull.

The sized steel plate has been fitted into place on the ship’s hull. The butts of the plate are tack welded into place and the seams will be riveted.  This arrangement gives the hull more flexibility and strength than an all welded hull.

This is a reaming tool.  Once the two plate have been lined up this tool makes sure the holes for the rivets are perfectly matched and the same size.

This is a reaming tool.  Once the two plate have been lined up this tool makes sure the holes for the rivets are perfectly matched and the same size.

The riveters will measure the thickness of the plates to be joined by the rivets.  Here a rivet is cut to the proper size.  The hull plates are thinner than the keel plate so it is important to measure.

The riveters will measure the thickness of the plates to be joined by the rivets.  Here a rivet is cut to the proper size.  The hull plates are thinner than the keel plate so it is important to measure.

The rivets are counted and arranged in the order that they will go into the forge.

The rivets are counted and arranged in the order that they will go into the forge.

This way the rivet team works seamlessly in getting the job done.  It’s a six-man team so organization makes the job run smoothly and quickly.

This way the rivet team works seamlessly in getting the job done.  It’s a six-man team so organization makes the job run smoothly and quickly.

The rivets are heated to over 2000 degrees Fahrenheit in a kerosene-fired forge.  This team member knows where the rest of team is in the process just by listening.

The rivets are heated to over 2000 degrees Fahrenheit in a kerosene-fired forge.  This team member knows where the rest of team is in the process just by listening.

The timing for heating the rivets is crucial as there is a small temperature range to get the hot rivet into place and the end peened over.

The timing for heating the rivets is crucial as there is a small temperature range to get the hot rivet into place and the end peened over.

You get a nice glow on a rivet at 2000 degrees  Fahrenheit.

You get a nice glow on a rivet at 2000 degrees Fahrenheit.

This is the pneumatic rivet gun.

This is the pneumatic rivet gun.

The two plates are initially bolted to hold them into place.  The riveters remove the bolts and replace them with rivets.

The two plates are initially bolted to hold them into place.  The riveters remove the bolts and replace them with rivets.

The bolts are placed in a W pattern.  When the first set of rivets has been installed the bolts will be removed and the remaining rivets will be installed.  The rivets are inserted from the inside of the hull.  You can see the peened rivets on the right of the photograph and the empty holes on the left.

The bolts are placed in a W pattern.  When the first set of rivets has been installed the bolts will be removed and the remaining rivets will be installed.  The rivets are inserted from the inside of the hull.  You can see the peened rivets on the right of the photograph and the empty holes on the left.

The rivet is held in place from the inside of the hull and the pneumatic drill peens it into place.

The rivet is held in place from the inside of the hull and the pneumatic drill peens it into place.

Seen above: The double bottom tanks of the BROWN do not offer a spacious work environment for the "Bucker."  There are at least two men in the tanks at any time during the process.

This riveter is using a caulking tool to assure that the seam is watertight.  This is not your ordinary caulking gun.  It forces the edge of the outer plate tightly against the inner plate.

This riveter is using a caulking tool to assure that the seam is watertight.  This is not your ordinary caulking gun.  It forces the edge of the outer plate tightly against the inner plate.

Andrea Horrocks

You can own your own piece of history!  CLICK HERE to make a tax deductible contribution to the Rivet Drive.  All contributions will go towards keeping the JOHN W BROWN in tip top shape and sailing for years to come.

Project Liberty Ship, Inc is a 501(c)3 non-profit, all volunteer organization engaged in the preservation and operation of the historic ship JOHN W. BROWN as a living memorial museum. Gifts to Project Liberty Ship are tax deductible.

 
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